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USS JUNEAU CL-52

USS Juneau (CL-52) was a United States Navy Atlanta-class light cruiser sunk at the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal in November 1942. In total 687 men, including the five Sullivan brothers, were killed in action.

On 8 November, Juneau departed Nouméa, New Caledonia under the command of Rear Admiral Richmond K. Turner to escort reinforcements to Guadalcanal. The force arrived there early morning on 12 November, and Juneau took up her station in the protective screen around the transports and cargo vessels. Unloading proceeded unmolested until 1405, when 30 Japanese planes attacked the alerted United States group. The AA fire was effective, and Juneau alone accounted for six enemy torpedo bombers shot down. The few remaining Japanese planes were in turn attacked by American fighters and only one bomber escaped. Later in the day, an American attack group of cruisers and destroyers cleared Guadalcanal on reports that a large enemy surface force was headed for the island. At 0148 on 13 November, Rear Admiral Daniel J. Callaghan's relatively small Landing Support Group engaged the enemy. The Japanese force consisted of two battleships, one light cruiser, and nine destroyers.

Because of bad weather and confused communications, the battle occurred in near pitch darkness and at almost point-blank range as the ships of the two sides became intermingled.  Juneau was struck on the port side by a torpedo causing a severe list, and necessitating withdrawal. Before noon on 13 November, Juneau, along with two other cruisers damaged in the battle headed toward Espiritu Santo for repairs. Juneau was steaming on one screw, keeping station 800 yards off the starboard quarter of the likewise severely damaged San Francisco. She was down 12 ft by the bow, but able to maintain 13 knots.  A few minutes after 1100, two torpedoes were launched from submarine I-26. These were intended for San Francisco, but both passed ahead of her. One struck Juneau in the same place that had been hit during the battle.

There was a great explosion; Juneau broke in two and disappeared in just 20 seconds. Fearing more attacks from I-26, and wrongly assuming from the massive explosion that there were no survivors, Helena and San Francisco departed without attempting to rescue any survivors. In fact, more than 100 sailors had survived the sinking of Juneau. They were left to fend for themselves in the open ocean for eight days before rescue aircraft belatedly arrived. While awaiting rescue, all but 10 died from shark attacks.  As about the five Sullivan brothers: two survived the sinking, only to die in the water, two presumably went down with the ship. Some reports indicate the fifth brother also survived the sinking, but disappeared during the first day in the water.

 





Like all of our warship models, this USS Juneau has the following qualities:

- Plank-on-frame, hollow hull construction (very important), weighing less than 10 lbs  (A solid hull of this model would be over 30 lbs which feels like a heavy toy rather than an art piece.)

- Hollow superstructure is comprised of many individual thin pieces of wood glued together, not several solid pieces of wood stacking on top one another.

- Windows are cutouts (not black decals), thanks to the hollow structures.

-  No computer-printed paper deck

- >95% of parts are wood and metal
.

- Light "rust"  appearance that only master modelers can make.

 

39" long x 5" wide X 13" tall (including base.)   $3,500    S & H is $90 

 

"Thanks for the update on the Arizona. I looked at the progress pictures.  Very, very nice. 
 
And again let me say that the Juneau is an absolutely great production.
 
My model of the USS San Francisco (CA-38)  [constructed by a CA-38 artisan many years ago] and of the SS Jerimiah O'Brien [constructed for me by you guys,  Model Ship Master] are temporarily on display in the  new Veteran's Hall here in Dixon;  and  will be soon joined by the Juneau, (which at moment still sits in all its glory in my front room) and when received, the Arizona. 
 
This, my personal collection,   as it grows,  will  also be on display at  other public locations here in Dixon--before winding up in a  permanent museum display home here in California or somewhere else in the West.
 
 
My best,
 
Heber"